Wealth Project: You’ve NO Chance of Riches! [Reviewed]

Howdy, thanks for landing on my Wealth Project review!

The sales page claims that you could rake in almost $18,000 in your very first week online, starting today!

Yeah, and I’m the Fairy freakin’ Godmother!

Unfortunately, it’s just another hypie “too good to be true” product stocked on Clickbank’s shelves.

It doesn’t work.

It’s a hoax.

If you wanna know exactly why this so-called money-making product isn’t gonna put a single dime in your pockets…

Then grab this honest and unbiased review.


Wealth Project Scam Review
 
Quick Overview

Name: Wealth Project (WP).

Website: wealthproject.net.

Cost: $37 + Upsells.

Owner: James Robertson (used as a stage name).

My Score: 2/10.

Summary: Sadly, the Wealthy Project is full of nothing but empty promises – just so the toerag behind it can make ALL the money.

If you think for one second that ‘WP’ is gonna change your life around in a matter of days, you’ll be deeply disaapointed.

All you really get from this product is some basic training on the concept of affiliate marketing – not nearly enough for actual success.

Do yourself a favour… Put your money away and search YouTube for higher quality and effective training for “free”.

But with that said, it’s not all doom and gloom with ‘WP’ because you can request a refund from ClickBank.


But before diving into this review.

Check out a 100% legitimate (hype-free) solution to making sustainable money on the web that ACTUALLY works…

==> Grab My #1 Recommended Program Here!

 

What’s The Wealth Project All About?


The Wealth Project sales page/video claims you could make a WHOPPING $17,520 in your first 7 days starting from this very second…

And then $17K/weekly for your entire life!

Apparently, for just 37 bucks, you can have this life-changing system set up in under 30 minutes and 21 clicks…

Reeling in a fortune using the system is a piece of cake…

135 members have already pocketed up to $17,000 in their very first week on autopilot…

Blah, blah, blah…

UGH!

I must admit, the sales video does a pretty good job at getting newbies pumped up.

So you can understand why numerous vulnerable folks easily get sucked in by all the hype.

 

How Does Wealth Project Work For a Buck?


The spokesperson in the video just bangs on about ‘WP’ being the best thing since sliced bread.

Basically selling you “the dream” of making a sh*t TON of money from minimal effort.

Unfortunately, there’s nothing about HOW the system actually works…

Other than it has nothing to do with filling surveys and investing in Bitcoin (or should I say Sh*tcoin), etc.

And there’s a VERY good reason for this.

So the person behind the so-called life-changer can get the better of your curiosity for pocketing YOUR cash.

It’s the same process with similar garbage products I’ve reviewed – Explode My PayDay, The China Secret and EB Formula, to name a few.

The unethical folks behind these info products don’t give a rat’s ass about your success.

As long as THEY are the ones living the life of Riley, that’s all that counts to them at the end of the day.

And I’m about to prove it to ya…

 

Let’s See The Red Flags Hoisted…


If what I’ve discussed isn’t enough to turn your stomach and send you running for the hills…

Then these Red Flags (scam warnings) inside the ‘WP’ sales video just might!

 

#1: False Income Claims…


The spokesperson claims a bunch of guys n’ gals from various worldwide locations have cashed in the big bucks with their first 7 days.
 
Fake Member Income Claims
 
But with zero evidence to support the existence of such members and their income claims…

Means they are fabricated because ANYONE can invent false stories online.

 

#2: James Robertson is a Stage Act…


The spokesperson also claims he’s “James Robertson” – the mastermind behind ‘WP’.
 
Wealth Project Fake Owner
 
Apparently, he’s also a writer, researcher, and online Biz expert.

The only thing James is an “expert” at is bullsh*tting his way to the bank LOL.

But again, there’s no photographic or even social proof of the guy’s existence.

In fact, I also have my suspicions that James is simply a “voice-over” hired on Fiverr.

It’s always the case with unethical folks who create these so-called Clickbank products.

They purposely hide their true identities behind “pen names” and random voices because it gives them the perfect cover for taking YOUR cash.

If ‘WE’ really was LEGIT, don’t you think the REAL creator would front their product?

Hmm…

 

#3: A False Sense of Security…


Lastly, James Robertson shares his sob story.
 
Fake Story About Being Broke
 
Aww, let’s get the violins out.

Don’t get me wrong, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with sharing a story.

Because “storytelling” is a powerful way of building rapport with folks and creating a successful Biz.

(It’s a strategy I learned from Russell Brunson’s free DotCom Secrets book).

But only IF the story is genuine.

In Jame’s case, I do believe he’s telling porkies because there’s no material (i.e old photos) to support his story.

Just like fake income claims, anyone can tell a cock-and-bull story and make it seem convincing, especially to newbies.

Put simply, the whole video contains the ramblings of some random fool. There isn’t an ounce of proof to back up his claims and promises.

So take everything you hear with a grain of salt.

 

How The Wealth Project “Really” Works…


The sad truth is that ‘WP’ is just some mythical system forged in Never Never Land.

What you actually receive access to is far from what the deceptive sales video promises.

But I guess there’s no real surprise there when it comes to these “get-rich-quick” Clickbank products.

Once you’ve made your $37 payment, all you get is some generic training on making money via the Amazon Associates program as an affiliate.

You’ll learn some basic stuff on how to choose a niche and start your own website to be able to earn an income from Amazon.

But the problem is that the training lacks “step-by-step” guidance and is inadequate for ACTUALLY making money on the web.

There needs to be more meat on the bone if you’re gonna be successful with ‘WP’.

It’s the same story with all of these “too good to be true” Clickbank products.

You’re sold the dream lifestyle, only to realise you get some shoddy PDF and/or video training that’s never gonna pay off.

 

Final Thoughts: Is The Wealth Project a Scam?…


A Big Thumbs DownSadly, the sales video spews out nothing but lie-after-lie because in reality, the Wealth Project is simply a fairy-tale.

If the concept of “get-rich-fast” online truly existed…

Don’t you think everyone and their grandmother would be as rich as an Argentine?

The ONLY intention of ‘WP’ is to trick as many beginners as possible into handing over their hard-earned cash to the person behind the so-called product.

So guess who’s gonna be laughing all the way to the bank, chomping on a steak dinner every night, and living the life of their wildest dreams?

Hint: It’s not gonna be you lol.

But even though the toerag behind ‘WP’ deceives you for HIS or HER own benefit…

I can’t really call it a flat-out scam because there is SOME value and also Clickbank will refund your 37 bucks.

So I’m labelling ‘WP’ as a borderline scam. Agree?

 

Wanna Get Your Hands on Something That Works?


The awesome news is that making money online is 100% doable.

But it’s not as “easy as pie” as the fraudsters behind all these so-called wealth systems make it sound.

First of all, you need to grab hold of the necessary tools, training, and support.

And secondly, it’s off to the races by working your tail off for months putting those resources into practice.

So if you’re willing to gain access to those said resources and fully prepared to work your tail off for success in the affiliate marketing arena…

==> Get My #1 Recommended Program (Wealthy Affiliate) Here!

 

Your Friend, Neil! 😀

If you have any questions or thoughts to share on ‘WP’ – We’d LOVE to hear from ya below…

4 Comments

  1. Leslie Renée January 16, 2019
    • Neil January 17, 2019
  2. Jean January 16, 2019
    • Neil January 17, 2019

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